Published Studies on tDCS

The scientific and academic research communities have been studying Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) for decades, with recent interest in the topic exploding over the last 10-15 years. In 2007, 2008 and 2011, the number of published studies on tDCS doubled that of the previous year. As of January 1, 2017 there are currently over 3,000 published tDCS studies on PubMed.gov, with nearly 700 (~23%) of them having been published in 2016 alone.

Below you will find a collection of the most recent scientific studies on tDCS. Each article includes data on where it was published, date published, contributing authors, as well as an abstract, or summary of the article.

 

  • A single session of prefrontal cortex transcranial direct current stimulation does not modulate implicit task sequence learning and consolidation.
    Related ArticlesA single session of prefrontal cortex transcranial direct current stimulation does not modulate implicit task sequence learning and consolidation. Brain Stimul. 2017 Jan 04;: Authors: Savic B, Müri R, Meier B Abstract BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is assumed to affect cortical excitability and dependent on the specific stimulation conditions either to increase or decrease learning. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to modulate implicit task sequence learning with tDCS. METHODS: As cortico-striatal loops are critically involved in implicit task sequence learning, tDCS was applied above the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In Experiment 1, anodal, cathodal, or sham ... read more
    PubMed Abstract – tDCS
  • Differential sensory cortical involvement in auditory and visual sensorimotor temporal recalibration: Evidence from transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).
    Related ArticlesDifferential sensory cortical involvement in auditory and visual sensorimotor temporal recalibration: Evidence from transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Neuropsychologia. 2017 Jan 12;: Authors: Aytemür A, Almeida N, Lee KH Abstract Adaptation to delayed sensory feedback following an action produces a subjective time compression between the action and the feedback (temporal recalibration effect, TRE). TRE is important for sensory delay compensation to maintain a relationship between causally related events. It is unclear whether TRE is a sensory modality-specific phenomenon. In 3 experiments employing a sensorimotor synchronization task, we investigated this question using cathodal transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS). We found that ... read more
    PubMed Abstract – tDCS